The Role of Historical Trauma in Indigenous Mental Health and Addictions

In the past couple of months, I have become increasingly interested in historical trauma and the impact it has had on the health and well-being of Aboriginal people here in Australia, and in other indigenous groups around the world. I’ll be talking more about it in the coming months.

For now, I want to introduce you to the promotional trailer of the film ‘Sharing Tebwewin’.

“Sharing Tebwewin” (Sharing the Truth) is a 30-minute educational documentary designed to help health workers become more “culturally competent” in their work with First Nations people.

It features interviews with Dr. Cornelia (Nel) Wieman, the first indigenous woman to become a psychiatrist in Canada. It also features a discussion panel of First Nations Health professionals and interviews with Stella Montour, a Consumer/Survivor advocate.

The video tackles the impacts of historical issues like Residential Schools and the 60’s Scoop and draws on the experience and knowledge of Nel and other professionals to illustrate why culturally specific and historically-informed services are an essential and immediate requirement.

You can see the full 30-min film on Vimeo. I have to confess I have only just found this link and haven’t watched the full film, but will do so shortly.

Speak Your Mind

*


4 + = 10