‘From Surviving to Thriving: Unleashing Creativity’ by Madeline Goldstein

IMG_20140827_133352_975-5-300x293Many things can facilitate healing and people need to find what helps them to heal. Here is a beautiful story about the power of photography, and creativity in general, by Madeline Goldstein from Mad in America.

“Adversity has effect of eliciting talents, which in prosperous circumstances would have lain dormant”
Horace

It started out innocently enough, with no preconceived ideas or expectations. I had no idea that what began as giving a gift would change my life forever.

I live in beautiful Boulder, Colorado. It is a college town nestled in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. As of this writing, I am eighteen months drug free after having been on Xanax for twenty years.

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‘I Am “Pro-Healing”’ by Hilary Bryant

“Yoga helped me explore and reconnect with the body I’d abandoned and abused for years. My pain and sadness had me living exclusively in my mind, my body nothing more than a battleground for my inner wars.

Through yoga and meditation, I slowly began to love myself again, learning to treat myself with care and respect. I felt a greater sense of self-awareness, and a sense of connection to something greater.

This was a drastic contrast to the days when I felt as if god had forgotten about me, or like I was a mistake not meant for this world.”

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Classic Blg: ‘All it takes is 10 mindful minutes’ by Andy Puddicombe

When is the last time you did absolutely nothing for 10 whole minutes? Not texting, talking or even thinking?

Mindfulness expert Andy Puddicombe describes the transformative power of doing just that: Refreshing your mind for 10 minutes a day, simply by being mindful and experiencing the present moment. (No need for incense or sitting in uncomfortable positions)

‘How to Beat Panic Attacks: 3 Simple Mindfulness Techniques’ by Krista Lester

PauseFound this interesting blog on the Tiny Buddha website.

‘“By living deeply in the present moment we can understand the past better and we can prepare for a better future.” Thich Nhat Hanh

When I was in high school, a hit-and-run car accident changed my world. My boyfriend at the time lost his nineteen-year-old brother to the accident. I had never met his brother, but it didn’t matter; a dark veil had been cast over my life.

In the days, weeks, months, and years following the accident, I sank into a deeper and deeper depression. I started to have panic attacks and I cut myself daily, trying to feel anything other than terror and despair. I sought treatment, met with therapists, tried dozens of medications, and routinely turned back to alcohol when nothing worked.

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Jon Kabat-Zinn: How can mindfulness change your life?

The role that Jon Kabat-Zinn has played in getting mindfulness into mainstream medical practice (and beyond) in the Western world has been huge.  He is a true hero.

Here’s a fascinating video that describes how mindfulness-based stress reduction {MBSR] ‘grew up’ on the eastern side of the US. It’s important to hear how Jon and his colleagues emphasise the importance of research and scientific evidence in underlying the widening acceptance of MBSR as an important therapeutic tool.

You can find much more about mindfulness on Recovery Stories – try a search.

‘Meditation transforms roughest San Francisco schools’ by David Kirp

628x471A cool article from SF Gate.

‘At first glance, Quiet Time – a stress reduction strategy used in several San Francisco middle and high schools, as well as in scattered schools around the Bay Area – looks like something out of the om-chanting 1960s. Twice daily, a gong sounds in the classroom and rowdy adolescents, who normally can’t sit still for 10 seconds, shut their eyes and try to clear their minds. I’ve spent lots of time in urban schools and have never seen anything like it.

This practice – meditation rebranded – deserves serious attention from parents and policymakers. An impressive array of studies shows that integrating meditation into a school’s daily routine can markedly improve the lives of students. If San Francisco schools Superintendent Richard Carranza has his way, Quiet Time could well spread citywide.

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‘These Digital Meditation Tools Can Be Your Gateway To A Calmer, More Effective Life’ by Carolyn Gregoire

rsz_n-meditation-large570Here’s an interesting blog from the Huffington Post, which also provides summaries on 12 online meditation tools. Here is part of Carolyn’s excellent blog. Check out the rest of her original blog.

‘Meditation, an ancient practice of calming the mind, would seem to be incompatible with modern technology, with its emphasis on speed and connectivity.

But as more and more Americans have embraced meditation as an antidote to hyper-connected lives, the world of technology has joined the movement. The result is a growing field of meditation tools – from apps and podcasts to timers and online classes – and a growing acknowledgment that, paradoxically, technology can help us to turn inward, still our minds, and shut out the many distractions around us.

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Andy Puddicombe: All it takes is 10 mindful minutes

When is the last time you did absolutely nothing for 10 whole minutes? Not texting, talking or even thinking?

Mindfulness expert Andy Puddicombe describes the transformative power of doing just that: Refreshing your mind for 10 minutes a day, simply by being mindful and experiencing the present moment. (No need for incense or sitting in uncomfortable positions)

Mark Williams on Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy

Professor Mark Williams of the University of Oxford talks about mindfulness meditation as an alternative treatment for depression. In fact, mindfulness is also a powerful tool to help someone recovering from addiction.

Check out various other YouTube clips on mindfulness from Mark Williams, Jon Kabat Zinn (who was instrumental in promoting mindfulness as a tool for health issues in the Western world) and others.

I include the book Mark refers to in my list of six books that can help your recovery in our Resources section. Here is what I say about the book:

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