Classic Blog: ‘Mind Platter’ by Dan Siegel

“Wouldn’t it be nice if people had an idea of what a daily intake would be for their mind? How do you keep your mind healthy? So what I’m going to do is share with you what the healthy mind platter has, the seven activities that can help keep your relationships healthy and actually integrate your brain…”

“Finally, our seventh activity is called connecting time. Now, connecting time is where we connect to other people, hopefully in person, and to the planet, to nature. I try to remember connecting time with the phrase, ‘3G2P’.

The 2P is two people and the planet. 3G is we bring this sense of connection with a feeling of generosity, of kindness, of open heartedness. And we do with this gratitude, for being alive for our connections to other people on the planet.

My Favourite Blogs: Setting up a Recovery Community

Phillip Valentine, Executive Director for the Connecticut Community for Addiction Recovery (CCAR), emphasises that the essential first stages in building a recovery community are to:

  • create a vanguard of recovering people who want to tell their story
  • organise the community, so that there are many different people, with many different types of recovery, all working towards the same aim.

Phil also stresses the importance of providing a way for people to ‘give back’ – giving back is an essential element of recovery for many people – tapping into this energy and ‘helping it flow to where it wants to go.’

Read More ➔

‘Mind Platter’ by Dan Siegel

“Wouldn’t it be nice if people had an idea of what a daily intake would be for their mind? How do you keep your mind healthy? So what I’m going to do is share with you what the healthy mind platter has, the seven activities that can help keep your relationships healthy and actually integrate your brain…”

“Finally, our seventh activity is called connecting time. Now, connecting time is where we connect to other people, hopefully in person, and to the planet, to nature. I try to remember connecting time with the phrase, ‘3G2P’.

The 2P is two people and the planet. 3G is we bring this sense of connection with a feeling of generosity, of kindness, of open heartedness. And we do with this gratitude, for being alive for our connections to other people on the planet.

Read More ➔

Michael’s Recovery Minute

“I was ingrained in CCAR to show the positive side of recovery, putting a face on recovery, allowing people to see that recovery was possible. A reality that people in many walks of life would able to get their life together again.

Michael Askew is Manager of the Bridgeport Community Recovery Center, under the auspices of CCAR. Formerly known as Dark Shadow, he has been in recovery from 1989 after being in and out of prison for years (seven visits).

Helping Others Goes Viral

I guess many of you have wondered how you make a video that goes viral on YouTube? Here’s one focused on helping other people. 

Giving back and helping others plays an important role in the recovery process. You can lean more about what facilitates recovery here.

Setting up a Recovery Community

Phillip Valentine, Executive Director for the Connecticut Community for Addiction Recovery (CCAR), emphasises that the essential first stages in building a recovery community are to:

  1. create a vanguard of recovering people who want to tell their story
  2. organise the community, so that there are many different people, with many different types of recovery, all working towards the same aim.

Read More ➔

Facilitating recovery with peer support

2007_0118walpole0167I emphasise three main elements to helping people recover from addiction to alcohol and other drugs.

Firstly, we must empower people, as recovery comes from the person (not the practitioner). They do the work in overcoming their substance use problems. We can empower people by providing hope, understanding and a sense of belonging.  

Secondly, people need internal resources (e.g. self-esteem, resilience) and external resources (e.g. family support, peer support) – recovery capital – to help them on their journey to recovery. They also need the basic essentials of living, i.e. roof over their head, money, someone who cares about them.

Read More ➔

Tim’s Story: ‘Doctor in Recovery’

As Tim found out, having a medical degree offers no protection against addiction, nor from the hard work that is required to change oneself as a key part of the recovery journey.

Read More ➔