‘Four Examples of Expensive Rehabs That Spread Stigma, Not Recovery’ by Tom Horvath

shaming‘Eliminating stigma against people in recovery appears to be a universally supported goal within the recovery community, and for good reason. Recovery is hard enough without this additional burden.

The unspoken assumption is that stigma is the fault of the “outside” world – not of other people in recovery. But the recovery community has failed to provide effective leadership on this issue. And one component of the community—treatment providers—frequently reinforces stigma. How can we expect the world at large to change when we don’t change?

I operate a treatment system with two residential facilities, a sober living home and outpatient services. Because relapse is common, we often see clients who have been to other facilities. Most are frustrated, and often furious, at how they have been treated elsewhere. They generally report that they were viewed by staff as entirely lacking good judgment or a capacity for self-management. Therefore their requests and perspectives were easy to dismiss, even ridicule. They often have not been treated with much hospitality, either.

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‘The True, The Good and The Beautiful’ by Phil Hanlon

‘In this video Professor Phil Hanlon suggests that if we are to transcend the problems of modernity we will have to understand why we are in our current predicament. To do so, he explores Plato’s idea that human beings naturally integrate the true (science), the good (ethics) and the beautiful (aesthetics or art).

We do this in our private lives but modernity has allowed a perverted version of one of the three (a reductionist and numerically driven version of science) to eclipse the other two particularly in government and organisations. The result is ‘scientism’ which is an ideology, as distinct from true science, which is an invaluable tool.

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Stanford humanities course empowers recovering addicts and alcoholics

12925-hope_ellen_newsI was really pleased to see Stanford University is conducting a course on historical female figures for recovering women of Hope House. The course is run by Humanities students who gain the chance to “connect with the humanity and hardships behind people whom our society usually writes off.”

I’ve always felt that too many universities remain detached from the realities of the communities within which they exist, so I was excited to see this approach. I really hope more universities work in this way.

‘Wende C. is a grandmother who worked in banking for 27 years. She is also a crack addict who checked herself into Hope House, a residential drug and alcohol treatment facility in Redwood City, Calif., so she could learn the skills she needs to recover from her addiction.

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