‘Recovery: What Do We Know and Where Might We Go?’ by David Best

Dr David Best of Monash University gives the Keynote Speech at the CSARS Conference at the University of Chester in 2014. Well worth watching, particularly as David is one of the world’s leading recovery researchers.

The talk ends after 65 minutes, after which there is a panel discussion.

‘A personal and social model of recovery’ by David Best

Unknown-1Here’s another excellent article from David Best which is essential reading for people trying to facilitate recovery.

‘There has been a subtle change to the role of recovery in UK addictions research, policy and practice in recent years, with a transition from the periphery to centre stage. But it can be argued that, for all the bluster, we still have a limited evidence base and we have not come far in developing an integrated or testable theoretical model.

Humphreys and Lembke (2013) have done a good job in summarising the ‘what works’ of recovery – focusing on three areas: peer-inclusive interventions, recovery housing and mutual-aid groups – so this article will not revisit that evidence.

What I will do is overview three key component parts of a theoretical model of recovery, then draw them together to derive conclusions about what we should do next to make policy and practice stronger in this area.

  1. Recovery capital – personal and social resources – the journey of growth
  2. Social identity and social contagion in recovery – the role of friends and connections
  3. Therapeutic landscapes of recovery – the role of location.

Read More ➔

‘The Potential of Recovery Capital’ by David Best and Alexandre Laudet

17a01ef7-2d9e-46cf-b051-57d841da3abd-620x372Here’s a classic text from David Best and Alexandre Laudet on recovery capital. This paper is part of the RSA project on recovery. Here is an introduction to the paper from the RSA.

‘The addictions field is now overflowing with references to ‘recovery’ with service providers and workers increasingly designated as ‘recovery-focused’, although in many areas there is confusion as to what that may mean in practice and what needs to change.

There is an increasing awareness that people do recover, but we have limited knowledge or science of what enables this to happen or at what point in the recovery journey. There is also the recognition that recovery is something that is grounded in the community and that it is a transition that can occur without professional input, and where professional input is involved, the extent of its role is far from clear.

Read More ➔

Most visited content: Nos 16 – 20

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI thought I’d do something different over the next four days. We’re going to look at the 20 most visited pieces of content on the website (other than from the About Us section). We’ll look at five per day.

20. ‘What is Recovery?”: David Best (blog from May 28th) We looked at some of the views of one of the leading researchers in the recovery field. I included quotes from his excellent book, Addiction Recovery: A Movement for Social Change and Personal Growth in the UK.

19.  Julie Repper and Rachel Perkins (blog from June 3rd) answered the same question, “What is Recovery?” I not only looked at how they characterised recovery, but also included quotes from people in recovery from their book Social Inclusion and Recovery: A Model for Mental Health Practice.

Read More ➔