‘Is Recovery the Right Word?’ by Dolly Sen

omeka-net-4762-archive-fullsize-757b9035f7beee79de9361dc5997f5bfExcellent reflections by Dolly Sen from an Archive of Mental Health Recovery Stories.

‘The problem with the Recovery Model is that it is a medical term, and is expected to sit safely and warmly in the medical world. The recovery model says you need to look beyond the symptoms and see the person. But the whole relationship between service user and professional is regulated by the symptoms, depending if your symptoms go up or down, decides what treatment you get, if any at all.

It is also assuming that there is an illness to recover from. That the mental and emotional pain is not a very human and very appropriate response to trauma, that it has to be pathological, a sickness.

If that wasn’t enough, it then puts you in a system where people blow out your candle and then ask you to get better, or it takes your candle away and then asks ‘where is your light?’ You won’t find a better example of catch 22 than in psychiatry.

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‘Healing from trauma (or from a psych diagnosis)’ by Monica Cassani

Monica Cassani of Beyond Meds has just uploaded an excellent blog and link to a film relating to trauma in young people. I couldn’t resist putting it up here. Here’s what Monica had to say:

‘There are people out there that get it. This video shows something that is just wonderful. We need to create more safe places for kids and adults both where they might heal from the trauma in our lives.

As I’ve often pointed out the tragic reality all to often is that the current mental health system further traumatizes rather than heals. For those of us who have been harmed by the system it becomes that much harder to find safety as the capacity to trust is further challenged.

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Why the need for recovery-based care?

testimonials_07A resonating message I have picked from many people affected by serious substance use problems over the years is their desperate need for hope (that they can recover) and understanding (of how to recover).

There is a dearth of readily accessible information on how to achieve recovery, information that is also relevant to the day-to-day struggles and obstacles that people face in trying to overcome addiction and related problems. Many people do not know anyone who has recovered from addiction. Many find the treatment system to be disempowering and lacking in hope.

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